Spotlight 8-6-2021

The first greyhound ever to achieve the Canine Performance Event CPE Agility Team Extraordinare (C-ATE)
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Congratulations to Sharon and Devin!

Black Tie Poet AX MXJ XF T2B DCAT CGC TKN

On August 6, 2021, Sharon Smith and Black Tie Poet AX MXJ XF T2B DCAT CGC TKN  aka Devin earned their Canine Performance Event CPE Agility Team Extraordinare (C-ATE) title.

Devin is the first greyhound to achieve this title which is awarded when 5,000 points have been achieved at the C level where no faults are allowed. It includes at least 20 qualifying scores in each of 6 different games (3,000 points) and an additional 2,000 points in games of the handler’s choosing. The games are standard, jumpers, full house, snooker, jackpot, wildcard, and colors. Each Q is worth between 15-25 points.

From Sharon: "Devin is a talented jumper and loves the tunnels - as long as the tunnel is not the first obstacle so he can get a running start. After all they are 24” tall and he is 29” tall so he has to crawl! He is a crowd favorite and always shows his joy for the sport of agility."

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Black Tie Poet AX MXJ XF T2B DCAT CGC TKN

On August 6, 2021, Sharon Smith and Black Tie Poet AX MXJ XF T2B DCAT CGC TKN  aka Devin earned their Canine Performance Event CPE Agility Team Extraordinare (C-ATE) title.

Devin is the first greyhound to achieve this title which is awarded when 5,000 points have been achieved at the C level where no faults are allowed. It includes at least 20 qualifying scores in each of 6 different games (3,000 points) and an additional 2,000 points in games of the handler’s choosing. The games are standard, jumpers, full house, snooker, jackpot, wildcard, and colors. Each Q is worth between 15-25 points.

From Sharon: "Devin is a talented jumper and loves the tunnels - as long as the tunnel is not the first obstacle so he can get a running start. After all they are 24” tall and he is 29” tall so he has to crawl! He is a crowd favorite and always shows his joy for the sport of agility."

Congratulations to Sharon and Devin!

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Malak, Joan and John

Joan and John Malak

Petersburg, MI

Majik Greyhound and Keeshonden

Joan and John Malak
Petersburg, MI
Majik Greyhound and Keeshonden

Puppies sometimes available
Adults sometimes available
Conformation
Agility
Lure coursing

Greyhound Lover’s Resource

Published in the AKC Gazette, February 2021

When I first started in greyhounds in 1985, the thing I needed most was a comprehensive resource to give me information about the breed.     There were a few GCA pamphlets, an obedience book called “Play Training Your Dog” by Gail Burnham, a few children’s books, and later I found some antique coursing books.    There were articles to be gleaned from various magazines as well, but I was always on the hunt for things to read.   The Greyhound Club of America also noticed this paucity of new literature dedicated to the American greyhound and set about to rectify the problem.     A publication committee was formed with Sue Lackey as its chair and included our own AKC President, Dennis Sprung.    The club archivist, Laurel Drew supplied much historical information as well as writing the historical notes in the beginning of the book.

“Greyhounds in America”, Volume 1 was born in 1989 after two years of tireless work;  collecting information on  top kennels, top dogs,  beautiful artwork,  and knowledgeable handler and judge interviews    GIA was written and compiled by Ms. Lackey with a goal of covering 200 years of the Greyhound’s presence in America.    The first time greyhounds were used on the continent for hunting to the elegant Greyhound Club of America Specialties are discussed and shown pictorially.    Advertising was solicited from the current greyhound owners and breeders to help underwrite the cost of the book so the more recent past is also represented.   The book also covers important information on breed standards, breeding, maintaining stud dogs, the influence of English and Scandinavian kennels on American breeding programs, coursing and many other topics.

Many of the unique qualities and subtilies of this breed were explained to me through the pages of this book.   Studying the photos and referring to the standard can illuminate many of the fine points.   As Sue Lackey suggested in her preface, the breed has remained unchanged over the years thanks to the breeders that have stayed true to our standard and the function of these dogs.    As one studies the photos of the past and the present, a greyhound looks like a greyhound.   Some are better than others, but there is no breed in which this is not true!

The clarity of the hundreds of photos reprinted in the book make this book irreplaceable in my collection.    This is a beautiful hard covered book with the logo of the Greyhound Club of America embossed on the cover and was first published with 500 copies.     These books sold out quickly through 1989 and 1990 and as the years past, the few the club had in reserve were auctioned at Specialties.     The book was reprinted and there continues to be a supply available through the club.   This is a book that is a necessity for the Greyhound fancier, breeder, and judge.

“Greyhounds in America”, reprinted, is available through the GCA website at a very reasonable rate.  If you do not own this book and you have an interest in this breed I suggest you take a look.

Patti Clark

Spotlight 12-11-2020

The first Greyhound to get an AKC tracking title since May 2015

Posted December 11, 2020

CH Lakilanni Carefree Highway RA TD FDC SC CA BCAT CGCA TKN

In March 2020, Michelle Te Velde and Lakilanni Carefree Highway aka Boone earned their TD (Tracking Dog) title at the Wenatchee Kennel Club Tracking Test.

From Michelle "It was Sunday March 15 and a storm front was going through, so the was a bit of snow, it was 27 degrees and gusty breeze/wind.

We drew first track, and Boone hates to wear a coat but he couldn't stop from shivering to even potty, so I put one on him and waited for the eye roll and attitude. I think he was too excited to object."

Boone is the first greyhound to get an AKC tracking title since May 2015.

Congratulations to Michelle and Boone!

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How to Judge a Sighthound

This article has been reprinted with permission from Bo Bengston.

Greyhound Judging Priorities

Published in the AKC Gazette, November 2020

This time, I would like to focus on judging priorities as seen by members of the Greyhound Club of America’s Education Committee.  Contributors to this article include June Matarazzo, Pamela Noll, Cynthia Swanson, and myself.    These committee members have over 125 years of greyhound experience combined and have these thoughts to share.   While the term judging priorities indicate that this information is for judges, it is also for the information of breeders, exhibitors, and the public that may be choosing their first greyhound.

There was total agreement in the first item to be considered and that is the Outline of the greyhound. The greyhound has a distinct silhouette, with smooth, flowing curves from nose to tail including a slight rise over the loin. The greyhound is both elegant and substantial, with the appearance of great power, agility and speed.  This athlete has an overall appearance of balance, with nothing extreme.    Said another way, the appearance of a curvaceous body is the hallmark of the breed.  Every good greyhound is a collection of curves and powerful muscling from neck, topline, underline, front and rear angulation and tail. All must be curved properly and with muscle.  A body with curves and muscling in the right places are necessary characteristics for this breed to function as the fastest sighthound, coursing after all types of game in all types of terrain.  What is incorrect and should be considered faulty? The lack of proper curves, ewe necks, completely level toplines, flatness across the loin, straight up-and-down shoulder angles,  forearm assemblies set on forward of the breast bone, straight underlines from brisket to loin, straight stifles and hocks, and a stiff, straight tail are all faulty and should penalized according to the severity.

Movement - The greyhound is as indicated above the fastest of all sighthounds and as mentioned in the last column, greyhound movement is characterized by the double suspension gait not the trot.   That gait is not practical for the ring so to that end, what should you see at the trot?   You should see smooth, long, and low strides with the appearance of moving effortlessly Movement in the ring must be purposeful, elastic, and light. The topline is relaxed and not rigid.  Tremendous reach and drive should not be rewarded.   Incorrect movement that can be seen in the ring today include short, stiff, or choppy strides; pounding on the forehand, single-tracking, hindquarters tucked-under so the dog lacks drive, and a hackney gait.

Balance – Our dogs are called the long dogs and said to stand over ground.    A greyhound is a rectangle, slightly longer than tall but not a lot longer than tall.  A greyhound should be up on leg with a medium-sized body on long, strong legs.  A greyhound with a very long mid-piece, or body mass, compared to his leg length is losing breed type.   A well laid back shoulder, consistent for a sighthound; with a humerus of sufficient length to avoid the straight up look, and balanced angulation in the rear are all necessary components of balance. Greyhound angulation, front and rear, is moderate and should never give the impression of being extreme.

In closing, evaluating the outline, the movement, and balance in both what you see on the stack and on the move, tells you what you need to know!

Patti Clark

What makes a Greyhound a Greyhound?

Published in the AKC Gazette, August 2020

I would like to introduce myself as the person writing the Greyhound column for the first time. My name is Patti Clark and I have been involved in various aspects of the sport of dogs since 1978. My interest in the Greyhound began almost 35 years ago and in 1991 I co-bred my first greyhound litter under the prefix, Willomoor with June Matarazzo. Professionally, I have been a clinical microbiologist, laboratory administrator, professor, and dog handler, juggling these careers simultaneously. I have recently retired from the role of full time laboratorian and have some time to write about things I love, so let’s get to it!

People often ask why is a greyhound shaped the way it is and why do they look like baby dinosaurs when they themselves are babies? Here is why. The outline of a greyhound shows us the parts and pieces that allow the Greyhound to do his unique job of hunting and chasing prey of various sizes, speed and over varied terrain for long periods of time. The parts and pieces must come together into a single unit that speaks to balance, symmetry, and oneness.

That’s a mouthful but let’s break it down a bit. We know from various writings dating back to the ancient Greeks that the greyhound was used to course a wide variety of game. We know Greyhounds were found inhabiting areas of sand, mountain, rocky hills and terrain in between. We see in canine art through the centuries, that the dogs were used in these places and for these purposes. How fortunate we are to have this documentation of an ancient breed!

So, back to the outline, so smooth and with seamless transitions from head to tail and brisket to loin, often described as the shape of a pair of S curves. Our standard calls for a slight rise over the loin that is both a curvature of the spine and muscling. This configuration allows for the contraction and expansion of the double suspended gait acting almost as a hinge. No breed does this better in my opinion.

A deep chest that allows for good lung capacity and tuck up to the loin that allows the rear and front legs to pull up tightly under the body and then explode out propelling the greyhound forward. A functional Greyhound has a strong neck which transitions into shoulder allowing for capture of game on the move. This neck is not only functional but adds to the elegance of this breed with its length and arch. At the other end, a long sweeping tail that curves slight upward on the move, completes the outline. Add to this, long legs under the body, forelegs that are as long from the elbow to the ground as the length from the withers to the elbow and a strong moderately -angled rear to match.

Hopefully, you can see a picture of an elegant, functional, well-muscled Greyhound in your mind from this description.

We will explore many other features of the greyhound in the future but hopefully this has whetted your appetite to know more about this beautiful, hunting sighthound.

Patti Clark